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Knoxville boy pleads to be left alone by bullies in video

A heartbreaking video of Keaton Jones from Knoxville, Tennessee, pleading to be left alone by bullies goes viral as celebrities, including Millie Bobby Brown, offer him their support.
News | Mail Online

Knoxville boy pleads to be left alone by bullies in video

A heartbreaking video of Keaton Jones from Knoxville, Tennessee, pleading to be left alone by bullies goes viral as celebrities, including Millie Bobby Brown, offer him their support.

Trump opens Mississippi Civil Rights Museum

Trump spoke at the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum despite the criticism of local Democratic lawmakers who said his presence at the event was an insult to African Americans.
News | Mail Online

Trump opens Mississippi Civil Rights Museum

Trump spoke at the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum despite the criticism of local Democratic lawmakers who said his presence at the event was an insult to African Americans.

Boris Johnson in Iran for talks to free Zaghari-Ratcliffe

Mr Johnson arrived in Iran this morning to meet foreign minister Javad Narif for talks to free Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe, the British woman arrested in 2016 after being accused of spying.
News | Mail Online

Boris Johnson in Iran for talks to free Zaghari-Ratcliffe

Mr Johnson arrived in Iran this morning to meet foreign minister Javad Narif for talks to free Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe, the British woman arrested in 2016 after being accused of spying.

Thousands line Paris streets for Johnny Hallyday funeral

Crowds have been assembled in central Paris since early this morning to pay tribute to the legendary French signer who died of lung cancer aged 74 on Wednesday.
News | Mail Online

Thousands line Paris streets for Johnny Hallyday funeral

Crowds have been assembled in central Paris since early this morning to pay tribute to the legendary French signer who died of lung cancer aged 74 on Wednesday.

Anorexic student starved to death by NHS care 

Averil Hart, 19, from Sudbury in Suffolk, was let down by every part of the organisation that should have cared for her, the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman says.
News | Mail Online

Anorexic student starved to death by NHS care 

Averil Hart, 19, from Sudbury in Suffolk, was let down by every part of the organisation that should have cared for her, the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman says.

Did Corbyn activists break election law?

Momentum group faced an official investigation into its election spending last night after it declared just £38,000 of expenditure – while raising more than £120,000.
News | Mail Online

Did Corbyn activists break election law?

Momentum group faced an official investigation into its election spending last night after it declared just £38,000 of expenditure – while raising more than £120,000.

Storm Caroline will Britain from TONIGHT bringing chaos

Storm Caroline is set to brings winds of up to 90mph, with the gales sending debris flying and causing a threat to life as well as bringing travel chaos. Snow and freezing temperatures will follow.
News | Mail Online

Storm Caroline will Britain from TONIGHT bringing chaos

Storm Caroline is set to brings winds of up to 90mph, with the gales sending debris flying and causing a threat to life as well as bringing travel chaos. Snow and freezing temperatures will follow.

Darlington man stabbed his love rival to death

David Saunders, 33, from Darlington, was driven into a ‘jealous rage’ when law student Sarah Bramley (pictured) sent him a photograph of her and Michael Lawson.
News | Mail Online

Darlington man stabbed his love rival to death

David Saunders, 33, from Darlington, was driven into a ‘jealous rage’ when law student Sarah Bramley (pictured) sent him a photograph of her and Michael Lawson.

Now one in three British teenagers is already overweight

More than a third of British teenagers are overweight or obese, putting them in danger of diabetes and heart disease as adults, statistics show, with teenage girls more likely to pile on the pounds.
News | Mail Online

Now one in three British teenagers is already overweight

More than a third of British teenagers are overweight or obese, putting them in danger of diabetes and heart disease as adults, statistics show, with teenage girls more likely to pile on the pounds.

Backlash as voters say £50bn Brexit bill is too high

The EU has taken advantage of Theresa May’s ‘botched’ Election to run rings around Britain in Brexit talks – and has used her weakened position to ‘punish’ us with a massive ‘divorce’ bill.
News | Mail Online

Backlash as voters say £50bn Brexit bill is too high

The EU has taken advantage of Theresa May’s ‘botched’ Election to run rings around Britain in Brexit talks – and has used her weakened position to ‘punish’ us with a massive ‘divorce’ bill.

Boy found frozen outside home in Birmingham

It is understood that Hakeem Hussain may have been in the near freezing temperatures outside his home in Birmingham for some time before his body was found.
News | Mail Online

Boy found frozen outside home in Birmingham

It is understood that Hakeem Hussain may have been in the near freezing temperatures outside his home in Birmingham for some time before his body was found.

UK weather: Two inches of snow to hit rush hour today

Winter does not officially start until Friday – but thundersnow, the rare phenomenon of lightning strikes illuminating falling snow, was reported today in North Yorkshire and near Newcastle.
News | Mail Online

UK weather: Two inches of snow to hit rush hour today

Winter does not officially start until Friday – but thundersnow, the rare phenomenon of lightning strikes illuminating falling snow, was reported today in North Yorkshire and near Newcastle.

Meghan Markle posed outside Buckingham Palace aged 15

PICTURE EXCLUSIVE: Posing outside the Palace with a close friend, little could the teenage Miss Markle know that 21 years later she would be engaged to a member of the Royal family.
News | Mail Online

Meghan Markle posed outside Buckingham Palace aged 15

PICTURE EXCLUSIVE: Posing outside the Palace with a close friend, little could the teenage Miss Markle know that 21 years later she would be engaged to a member of the Royal family.

No trade deal would cost EU twice as many jobs as Britain

The report, by the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), warned of more than 290,000 job losses in Germany and approximately 140,000 in each of France and Italy.
News | Mail Online

No trade deal would cost EU twice as many jobs as Britain

The report, by the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), warned of more than 290,000 job losses in Germany and approximately 140,000 in each of France and Italy.

Lions taken from mothers then shot in tiny enclosures

It is the most degrading and cruel of fates for the king of the jungle. Bred in captivity in South Africa, lion cubs are torn from their mothers while still blind, a few days after birth.
News | Mail Online

Lions taken from mothers then shot in tiny enclosures

It is the most degrading and cruel of fates for the king of the jungle. Bred in captivity in South Africa, lion cubs are torn from their mothers while still blind, a few days after birth.

Parents of Manchester Bomb victim marry in ceremony

Charlotte Campbell, the mother of Olivia Campbell-Hardy, married Paul Hodgson at Bury Register Office today six months after her daughter died at Manchester Arena.
News | Mail Online

Parents of Manchester Bomb victim marry in ceremony

Charlotte Campbell, the mother of Olivia Campbell-Hardy, married Paul Hodgson at Bury Register Office today six months after her daughter died at Manchester Arena.

Polo enthusiast who met royals drugs mastermind US claims

Muhammad Asif Hafeez, a familiar face on the polo circuit and a man noted for his quiet charm, who met Princes William and Harry as well as other royals, is facing extradition to the U.S on drugs charges.
News | Mail Online

Polo enthusiast who met royals drugs mastermind US claims

Muhammad Asif Hafeez, a familiar face on the polo circuit and a man noted for his quiet charm, who met Princes William and Harry as well as other royals, is facing extradition to the U.S on drugs charges.

Peter Oborne says Jeremy Corbyn will never be PM 

Voters overlooked his befriending of extremists and crazy Marxist policies, and compared him favourably with Theresa May’s robotic performances but he will never be Prime Minister.
News | Mail Online

Peter Oborne says Jeremy Corbyn will never be PM 

Voters overlooked his befriending of extremists and crazy Marxist policies, and compared him favourably with Theresa May’s robotic performances but he will never be Prime Minister.

Aspirin link to cerebral palsy in babies

Newborns were almost two-and-a-half times more likely to have the incurable condition if their mothers took aspirin and 50 per cent more likely if they took paracetamol, a
News | Mail Online

Aspirin link to cerebral palsy in babies

Newborns were almost two-and-a-half times more likely to have the incurable condition if their mothers took aspirin and 50 per cent more likely if they took paracetamol, a

Open window will help you sleep by stopping CO2 build up

If you struggle to get a good night’s sleep, think about opening your bedroom window or door. It helps the air circulate at night, leading to better quality sleep, a study found.
News | Mail Online

Open window will help you sleep by stopping CO2 build up

If you struggle to get a good night’s sleep, think about opening your bedroom window or door. It helps the air circulate at night, leading to better quality sleep, a study found.

Falklands Islands to be protected by new missile shield

British defence chiefs have bought the Sky Sabre missile shield to protect the Falklands, which uses pioneering technology, as Argentina bolsters its air force with more planes.
News | Mail Online

Falklands Islands to be protected by new missile shield

British defence chiefs have bought the Sky Sabre missile shield to protect the Falklands, which uses pioneering technology, as Argentina bolsters its air force with more planes.

Royal Navy deploys patrol ship to search for Argentine sub

Britain sent the HSM Protector, a polar exploration vessel, to the southern Argentine Sea to search for the military sub ARA San Juan, which lost contact with officials three days ago.
News | Mail Online

Royal Navy deploys patrol ship to search for Argentine sub

Britain sent the HSM Protector, a polar exploration vessel, to the southern Argentine Sea to search for the military sub ARA San Juan, which lost contact with officials three days ago.

Meghan Markle’s ancestor was beheaded by King Henry VIII

Lord Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford in Lincolnshire, was a rich landowner who fell out of favour after being implicated in a rebellion against the Tudor monarch.
News | Mail Online

Meghan Markle’s ancestor was beheaded by King Henry VIII

Lord Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford in Lincolnshire, was a rich landowner who fell out of favour after being implicated in a rebellion against the Tudor monarch.

Yazidi woman describes her time as an ISIS sex slave

Nadia Murad, 24, a Yazidi woman who was kidnapped and sold as a sex slave to Islamic State militants in 2014, is detailing her harrowing ordeal in a new book released Tuesday.
News | Mail Online

Yazidi woman describes her time as an ISIS sex slave

Nadia Murad, 24, a Yazidi woman who was kidnapped and sold as a sex slave to Islamic State militants in 2014, is detailing her harrowing ordeal in a new book released Tuesday.

UK Anti-Doping calls on broadcasters and sponsors

UK Anti-Doping boss Nicole Sapstead wants broadcasters and sponsors to invest in clean sport to protect themselves from the risk of scandal and restore public confidence in elite performance.

According to research commissioned by the agency, nea

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UK Anti-Doping calls on broadcasters and sponsors

UK Anti-Doping boss Nicole Sapstead wants broadcasters and sponsors to invest in clean sport to protect themselves from the risk of scandal and restore public confidence in elite performance.

According to research commissioned by the agency, nearly half of all British adults believe doping is widespread in top-level sport.

Carried out by ComRes, the poll also found that nearly two thirds of the 2,027 adults questioned last month said recent coverage of high-profile cases has had a negative impact on their trust in sport's integrity.

Speaking to Press Association Sport, Sapstead admitted these numbers were "alarming" and "damning" but said she took some reassurance from the findings that six out of 10 adults believe Britain has a stricter anti-doping system than elsewhere and nearly two in three think sport is cleaner in Britain than in other countries.

But the UKAD chief executive said she would like to see both of those figures much higher and that will take more money than the agency's current budget of just over £7million, of which more than £5million comes from government.

"The question of more money for anti-doping should not just be one for the various sports - I would also ask the question of sponsors, broadcasters and anybody who is financially involved," said Sapstead.

"If you are going to stake your brand and reputation on something, wouldn't you want some reassurance that what you are investing in is compliant with the rules? It should be a part of their due diligence but I don't think enough sponsors are asking that question.

"But if they are asking that question, my guess is they are not going to get the reassurance they need very often. That is when they should come to us.

"Doping should be on their risk registry and they should do anything they can to mitigate the threat of reputation damage - it is very clear to me that we cannot keep expecting the public purse to foot the bill for clean sport."

As well as more money, Sapstead would also like greater powers to investigate, as anti-doping has become about so much more than collecting and testing samples. Many of the most famous cases in recent years owe much more to old-fashioned police work, or investigative journalism, than laboratories.

Sapstead said one obvious improvement in this area would be the ability to quickly follow up leads on rogue coaches or doctors that are often held up by data protection laws.

"We often just get a name and it would be very helpful if we could find out if this person is registered with a sport so we can get a number or address - this should be a condition of their licence to operate within that sport," she said.

"But if we get more powers we would need more money to be able to use them - so I would always take more money."

Set up as an independent body in 2009, UKAD has been through a particularly busy and, at times, bruising period.

Having taken on the responsibility of helping the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) to rebuild Russia's discredited drug-testing system early last year, UKAD lost a highly-charged case at the Court of Arbitration for Sport against British cycling star Lizzie Deignan over her missed tests in the build-up to the Rio Olympics and then started a long and expensive investigation into alleged wrongdoing within British Cycling and Team Sky.

That investigation is ongoing, although it is understood to be nearing a conclusion, but the postponed case against former world heavyweight champion Tyson Fury, another highly contentious inquiry, remains bogged down in legal disputes.

There is also the growing threat of cyber attacks from foreign hackers trying to discredit the entire anti-doping system, as occurred last week when the so-called Fancy Bears released stolen data from the International Association of Athletics Federations.

UKAD's Russian intervention, however, is a more positive story, as the revamped Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) is getting closer to regaining its WADA stamp of approval.

Sapstead believes this is the kind of work UKAD should talk about more often so the public can "see the full picture" and this is why it has launched National Clean Sport Week, a series of educational projects around the country from July 10-17th.

"I don't think the public knows about all the positive work we are doing and I think we have to get better at telling those stories, telling people that we are here and that our athletes are tested," she said.

"Of course, if we never had any adverse outcomes, people would question our effectiveness and the reality is bad news sells, we all know that.

"But what I would like us to do more of is filling the gaps between scandals with the more positive stories about our work."


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But the UKAD chief executive said she would like to see both of those figures much higher and that will take more money than the agency's current budget of just over £7million, of which more than £5million comes from government.

"The question of more money for anti-doping should not just be one for the various sports - I would also ask the question of sponsors, broadcasters and anybody who is financially involved," said Sapstead.

"If you are going to stake your brand and reputation on something, wouldn't you want some reassurance that what you are investing in is compliant with the rules? It should be a part of their due diligence but I don't think enough sponsors are asking that question.

"But if they are asking that question, my guess is they are not going to get the reassurance they need very often. That is when they should come to us.

"Doping should be on their risk registry and they should do anything they can to mitigate the threat of reputation damage - it is very clear to me that we cannot keep expecting the public purse to foot the bill for clean sport."

As well as more money, Sapstead would also like greater powers to investigate, as anti-doping has become about so much more than collecting and testing samples. Many of the most famous cases in recent years owe much more to old-fashioned police work, or investigative journalism, than laboratories.

Sapstead said one obvious improvement in this area would be the ability to quickly follow up leads on rogue coaches or doctors that are often held up by data protection laws.

"We often just get a name and it would be very helpful if we could find out if this person is registered with a sport so we can get a number or address - this should be a condition of their licence to operate within that sport," she said.

"But if we get more powers we would need more money to be able to use them - so I would always take more money."

Set up as an independent body in 2009, UKAD has been through a particularly busy and, at times, bruising period.

Having taken on the responsibility of helping the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) to rebuild Russia's discredited drug-testing system early last year, UKAD lost a highly-charged case at the Court of Arbitration for Sport against British cycling star Lizzie Deignan over her missed tests in the build-up to the Rio Olympics and then started a long and expensive investigation into alleged wrongdoing within British Cycling and Team Sky.

That investigation is ongoing, although it is understood to be nearing a conclusion, but the postponed case against former world heavyweight champion Tyson Fury, another highly contentious inquiry, remains bogged down in legal disputes.

There is also the growing threat of cyber attacks from foreign hackers trying to discredit the entire anti-doping system, as occurred last week when the so-called Fancy Bears released stolen data from the International Association of Athletics Federations.

UKAD's Russian intervention, however, is a more positive story, as the revamped Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) is getting closer to regaining its WADA stamp of approval.

Sapstead believes this is the kind of work UKAD should talk about more often so the public can "see the full picture" and this is why it has launched National Clean Sport Week, a series of educational projects around the country from July 10-17th.

"I don't think the public knows about all the positive work we are doing and I think we have to get better at telling those stories, telling people that we are here and that our athletes are tested," she said.

"Of course, if we never had any adverse outcomes, people would question our effectiveness and the reality is bad news sells, we all know that.

"But what I would like us to do more of is filling the gaps between scandals with the more positive stories about our work."


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London: body of eighth victim recovered from Thames.

The family of Spanish banker Ignacio Echeverría have confirmed he was killed in the London Bridge attack after trying to fend off a terrorist with his skateboard and help an injured woman.

According to Spanish media, relatives were told of the

Новости - mainAssistant.com

London: body of eighth victim recovered from Thames.

The family of Spanish banker Ignacio Echeverría have confirmed he was killed in the London Bridge attack after trying to fend off a terrorist with his skateboard and help an injured woman.

According to Spanish media, relatives were told of the 39-year-old’s death by Spanish ambassador Carlos Bastarreche, after the family flew in to London on Tuesday.

Echeverría was reported missing after he was last seen in the area of Borough Market defending a woman with his skateboard.

His father, Joaquin Echeverría, had told the Associated Press that British authorities had not shared any information with them, but his son’s employer, HSBC, had provided the services of a private detective to help with their search.

On Wednesday, journalist and relative Isabel Durán wrote on Twitter: “Ignacio Echeverría attacked the terrorists to try to save a woman. He is in heaven with his inseparable skateboard.”

A paramedic has described being confronted by a sea of bodies, with patients and police officers “screaming for help” amid gunfire – moments after the London Bridge attacks, PA reports.

Gary Edwards, 29, said he had “a gut feeling” about the extent of the tragedy as he arrived on the south side of the bridge at around 10.10pm on Saturday.

He said he feared there was something “more sinister” than initial reports, which suggested a possible drink-driver running down pedestrians on the bridge, as he put on body armour and ran towards danger.

The paramedic said he feared for his own safety as he prepared to come face to face with an armed attack. And he praised the speed and scale of the response from his emergency service colleagues which he said “definitely” saved lives.

Edwards, who joined the London ambulance service in 2008, had been on solo duty in Southwark that evening in a Volvo fast-response car. He was attending a call several streets away with Met officers when the first details came through on the police radio.

He said: “Instantly I had a gut feeling something was going on, something more sinister. The police officers ran off and I followed them.

“When I arrived there was a sea of blue lights in front of me from the police cars. There were multiple patients laying on the floor, and lots of people running towards me as I parked up opposite the Post Office.

“I couldn’t get any further up because of the amount of people and police cars. There were 10 to 15 people laying all over the pavement and in the middle of the road. I’m being approached by lots of members of the public and police officers screaming for help. At that part of the bridge I was the first paramedic on the scene.”

Edwards, one of around 80 called to the scene, said several casualties barricaded themselves in bars and restaurants amid fear the attack was continuing.

A second French citizen has been confirmed killed in the London Bridge attack and a third is missing taking the number of potential victims to eight.

The French foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, said in a statement: “It is with great sadness that I have learned that one of the French citizens, who was previously given as unaccounted for, has been identified among those who have died.”

The minister did not identify the new victim, but reports said it was Sébastien Bélanger, 36, AFP reports.

Bélanger, was reported to be missing by his girlfriend, Gerda Bennet, in a series of online posts. Bennet, who works as a bartender in Hoxton in the east of the city, said her boyfriend had been at London Bridge with friends on Saturday night and had not been seen since.

Appealing for information, she said she had called his number repeatedly but had heard no news. “My heart is broken and I wish no one in this world could feel what I feel now,” she wrote.

Alexandre Pigeard, 26, who was working in a French restaurant in Borough Market, has already been confirmed as being among the seven people killed in the knife and van attack on Saturday.

Le Drian said a third French citizen remained missing following the attack.

He is thought to be 45-year-old Xavier Thomas, who was in London for the weekend with his girlfriend.

London’s Metropolitan police on Tuesday issued a public appeal for information about him.

“Witness accounts suggest that it is possible that Xavier was struck by the van that resulted in him being thrown into the River Thames,” police said in a statement.

A Met spokesman said the search for Thomas continued on Wednesday.

Thomas’ girlfriend was seriously injured after being hit by the attackers’ van.

The Spanish authorities are still trying to trace Ignacio Echeverría, a 39-year-old from Madrid who works for HSBC in London. He has not been seen since the attack on Saturday night.

He had apparently been skateboarding in a park with friends when he stopped to help a woman who had been injured in the atrocity. His family have put out an appeal on Facebook, but are still awaiting news.

Echeverría’s brother Joaquín, who is using Facebook to appeal for information, said the family had been asked for his fingerprints, adding: “That’s not a good sign.”

If Thomas and Echeverría are confirmed to have been killed in the attack that would take the number of victims to eight: two Australians, three French, a Spaniard, a Briton and a Canadian.

Borough High Street was reopened to traffic on Wednesday morning, but Borough Market remains closed off, behind tall police barriers made from substantial sheets of green metal and netting.

There is still a heavy police presence, with officers guarding all the entrances to the undercover market beneath the railway lines, and standing at the doorway of the Barrowboy and Banker pub.

There is no sign of any armed officers this morning, and most of the police’s time is taken up with giving directions to confused commuters, who are still trying to navigate the area, where many back streets remain closed off to the public.

Southwark council draped netting over the large pile of flowers piled opposite the Barrowboy and Banker pub to stop them being blown away in yesterday’s storm. Even the market’s shops and restaurants that face onto Borough High Street – Borough Kitchen, Lobos Tapas and Leon – remain closed. Police said the market was unlikely to reopen today.


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UK terror threat level raised to critical

Children are among the 22 killed and 119 injured in a suicide bombing at the end of an Ariana Grande concert at Manchester Arena.

The bomber has been named as 22-year-old Salman Abedi.

Detectives made at least one arrest this morning a

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UK terror threat level raised to critical

Children are among the 22 killed and 119 injured in a suicide bombing at the end of an Ariana Grande concert at Manchester Arena.

The bomber has been named as 22-year-old Salman Abedi.

Detectives made at least one arrest this morning and ISIS claimed responsibility for the atrocity.

In the wake of the event, Theresa May announced live on TV that Britain's terror threat is being increased to 'Critical' - meaning an attack may be imminent.

Ariana Grande superfan Georgina Bethany Callander, 18, and eight-year-old Saffie Rose Roussos were the first victims to be named. John Atkinson, 26, is the third victim to be named.

A vigil has been held in the city's Albert Gardens tonight, attended by politicians including Jeremy Corbyn and celebrities such as Andrew Flintoff.

Our sister title the Manchester Evening News has set up a crowdfunding campaign to support the victims and their families.


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Julian Assange to request political asylum in France

Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, intends to ask France a political asylum, his attorney Juan Branco said in the France Info radio live.

"I think France should be conscientious about this issue and offer Assange political asylum," the la

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Julian Assange to request political asylum in France

Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, intends to ask France a political asylum, his attorney Juan Branco said in the France Info radio live.

"I think France should be conscientious about this issue and offer Assange political asylum," the lawyer said.

"He now wants to leave the Embassy of Ecuador in London and request France for an appropriate motion to offer him asylum in order to protect him from US prosecution," the lawyer stated.

According to Branco, his client has good reason to believe he will be extradited to the US the moment he leaves the embassy. "There were threats to hand Julian Assange a life sentence, even from Donald Trump himself a few weeks ago," the lawyer explained.

Earlier in 2015, Assange sent an open letter to then-president of France Francois Hollande asking for political asylum. Among other things, the WikiLeaks founder said that his further stay in the embassy, where he was confined since 2012, constituted a danger to his physical and moral health.

The Elysee Palace declined Assange’s request then. For now, the lawyer said, all that is left is the hope that the position of current French President Emmanuel Macron will turn out to be different.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has given a public statement after rape allegations made against him were dropped by Swedish prosecutors on Friday. Assange sought political asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London in 2012 and has been living there since, fearing subsequent extradition to America.

“Today is an important victory for me, and for the UN human rights system. But it by no means erases seven years of detention without charge – in prison, under house arrest, and almost five years here in this embassy without sunlight," he told press outside the embassy.

“Seven years without charge, while my children grew up without me. That is not something that I can forgive, it is not something that I can forget.

“The inevitable inquiry into what has occurred in this moment of terrible injustice is something that I hope will be more than just about me, and this situation, because the reality is, detention and extradition without charge has become a feature of the EU.

“A feature which has been exploited, yes, in my case, for political reasons, but for other cases have subjected many people to terrible injustices.”

Assange says that while “today was an important victory, an important vindication,” the “war is far from over.”

He says that while the UK has said it will arrest him, and the US has said he and other WikiLeaks staff have no rights and that his arrest is a priority, “WikiLeaks will continue publication.”

Assange added that he is happy to engage with the US Justice Department.

“While US has made extremely threatening remarks, always happy to engage in dialogue over what has occurred.”

He added: “My staff, my legal staff, have contacted the UK authorities and we hope to engage in a dialogue about what is the best way forward.”

“To some extent the UK has been exploited by the process it entered into with the EU, where it agreed to extradite people without charge.

“That is to an extend a forced position the UK has been put into. And, the first part of that is over. The UK refuses to confirm or deny at this stage whether a US extradition warrant is in the UK territory.”

Assange thanked “Ecuador, its people and its asylum system. They have stood by my asylum in the face of intense pressure.”

Assange also addressed the release of Channing Manning.

“We have had an even more important victory this week [and] that is the release of Chelsea Manning after seven years in military prison.”


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"He now wants to leave the Embassy of Ecuador in London and request France for an appropriate motion to offer him asylum in order to protect him from US prosecution," the lawyer stated.

According to Branco, his client has good reason to believe he will be extradited to the US the moment he leaves the embassy. "There were threats to hand Julian Assange a life sentence, even from Donald Trump himself a few weeks ago," the lawyer explained.

Earlier in 2015, Assange sent an open letter to then-president of France Francois Hollande asking for political asylum. Among other things, the WikiLeaks founder said that his further stay in the embassy, where he was confined since 2012, constituted a danger to his physical and moral health.

The Elysee Palace declined Assange’s request then. For now, the lawyer said, all that is left is the hope that the position of current French President Emmanuel Macron will turn out to be different.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has given a public statement after rape allegations made against him were dropped by Swedish prosecutors on Friday. Assange sought political asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London in 2012 and has been living there since, fearing subsequent extradition to America.

“Today is an important victory for me, and for the UN human rights system. But it by no means erases seven years of detention without charge – in prison, under house arrest, and almost five years here in this embassy without sunlight," he told press outside the embassy.

“Seven years without charge, while my children grew up without me. That is not something that I can forgive, it is not something that I can forget.

“The inevitable inquiry into what has occurred in this moment of terrible injustice is something that I hope will be more than just about me, and this situation, because the reality is, detention and extradition without charge has become a feature of the EU.

“A feature which has been exploited, yes, in my case, for political reasons, but for other cases have subjected many people to terrible injustices.”

Assange says that while “today was an important victory, an important vindication,” the “war is far from over.”

He says that while the UK has said it will arrest him, and the US has said he and other WikiLeaks staff have no rights and that his arrest is a priority, “WikiLeaks will continue publication.”

Assange added that he is happy to engage with the US Justice Department.

“While US has made extremely threatening remarks, always happy to engage in dialogue over what has occurred.”

He added: “My staff, my legal staff, have contacted the UK authorities and we hope to engage in a dialogue about what is the best way forward.”

“To some extent the UK has been exploited by the process it entered into with the EU, where it agreed to extradite people without charge.

“That is to an extend a forced position the UK has been put into. And, the first part of that is over. The UK refuses to confirm or deny at this stage whether a US extradition warrant is in the UK territory.”

Assange thanked “Ecuador, its people and its asylum system. They have stood by my asylum in the face of intense pressure.”

Assange also addressed the release of Channing Manning.

“We have had an even more important victory this week [and] that is the release of Chelsea Manning after seven years in military prison.”


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Three Sisters review at Piccadilly Theatre, London

Stark, severe, and infused with a sense of almost stifling desperation, Galina Volchek’s take on Chekhov’s Three Sisters is both gruelling and engrossing.

Concluding a brief West End retrospective of the work of Moscow’s renowned Sovremenn

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Three Sisters review at Piccadilly Theatre, London

Stark, severe, and infused with a sense of almost stifling desperation, Galina Volchek’s take on Chekhov’s Three Sisters is both gruelling and engrossing.

Concluding a brief West End retrospective of the work of Moscow’s renowned Sovremennik Theatre, the production features an impressive cast who comfortably convey the play’s cold compassion and austere humour.

A scene-stealing Ilya Drevnov chews – and quite often overturns – the scenery, marching mechanically about the space as aggressively contrarian Captain Soleny. Alyona Babenko plays middle sister Masha with an ideal mix of weary reserve and frustrated passion. Beside her, Vladislav Vetrov gives a gentle, imploring edge to her lover Vershinin’s dreamy philosophising. His arrival throws the family into a literal spin – the stage revolves on a turntable at an impressively reckless speed.

Designers Slava Zaitsev and Petr Kirillov have rendered the set as a bleak, whitewashed expanse, broken only by a few items of furniture, and framed by a slender, arching bridge. Damir Ismagilov’s bold lighting paints it all in broad strokes of lush indigo and fiery sunset pink. Distant sounds drift from offstage, a constant reminder of the outside world passing by. A plaintive violin plays in another room. Drunken soldiers sing in the street. A bitter wind whistles constantly.

In a play that can become bogged down in introspection, this lightness of touch is refreshing and energising. The production’s real achievement, though, is in making the characters’ self-imposed tragedies, and their fruitless longing for meaning, feel immediate, unendurable, and even heroic.


The Stage

UK desires to increase trade with China, Pakistan

A business roundtable on ‘UK`s participation in the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC)` - a flagship project of China’s broader ‘One Belt One Road (OBOR)’ initiative- was organised by the Department of International Trade at Foreign & Com

Новости - mainAssistant.com

UK desires to increase trade with China, Pakistan

A business roundtable on ‘UK`s participation in the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC)` - a flagship project of China’s broader ‘One Belt One Road (OBOR)’ initiative- was organised by the Department of International Trade at Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on Wednesday.

The meeting was attended by Rt Hon Greg Hands Minister of State for International Trade, H.E. Syed Ibne Abbas, Pakistan High Commissioner to the UK, H.E. Thomas Drew, British High Commissioner to Pakistan, H.E. Liu Xiaoming, Chinese Ambassador to UK, besides other senior officials of the three countries.

Other participants in the roundtable included experts from City UK, RUSI and the China Britain Business Council. Businesses including HSBC, Deloitte and Standard Chartered also discussed how they and other British firms could support the delivery of CPEC.

The representatives of the three countries expressed their resolve to work together to implement the CPEC project successfully for the benefit of all the partners.

The UK has expressed its desire to become a key partner in CPEC, a collection of $54bn worth infrastructure projects due for construction throughout Pakistan and the roundtable comes ahead of a larger CPEC conference in May hosted by the UK government and Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), to show how the UK’s world-leading expertise in areas such as financial and professional services, and energy and infrastructure can support China and Pakistan’s economic vision.

In this context, British Minister of State for International Trade is planning to visit Pakistan in near future, to explore business opportunities and initiate trade dialogue.

International Trade Minister Greg Hands said: “Britain is a country of global influence and can be an important partner for China and Pakistan in the delivery of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, which has the potential to build closer links between our countries. We have a clear ambition to increase trade with both China and Pakistan and UK businesses are well placed to capitalise on the new opportunities in the region.”

In his remarks on the occasion, the Pakistan High Commissioner stated that excellent ties between Pakistan and China are time tested and exemplary in state relations.

On CPEC, he said that $54 Billion investment in four areas namely infrastructure, energy, Special Economic Zones and Gwadar port would give necessary impetus to Pakistan’s economy, thus creating enormous opportunities for the global corporate enterprises. Strengthening trade and economic ties in the region and beyond, remains the central plank of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif ‘s vision of ‘Peace for development’ and ‘peaceful neighbourhood’. In this context, the transformative CPEC is not only a game changer for Pakistan but for the entire region.

The high commissioner also highlighted the successes which Pakistan has achieved in the economic front in the recent past which include 5.2% economic growth rate, achievement of ‘emerging market’ status by international credit rating agencies, declaration of Pakistan Stock Exchange as one amongst the 5 best performing stock exchanges of the world.

He invited British investors and businesses to explore Pakistan for the business opportunities on account of its strategic location, resilient economy and growing consumer market. He also informed the participants about Pakistan High Commission’s plan to hold an investment conference in September this year at Mansion House in collaboration with the Lord Mayor of London office.

The chinese ambassador stated that relations between Pakistan and China are mutually beneficial. He noted that Pakistan’s geographic position, demographic dividend and economic potential would continue to give the CPEC a great advantage and would enable the Corridor to play a bigger role in promoting regional connectivity and cooperation. That in turn will contribute to regional peace, stability and prosperity, added the Ambassador.

He further stated that the One Belt One Road initiative is open to all and so far more than 100 countries and International organizations have expressed support for this initiative. The Ambassador welcomed British Government’s desire to participate in the delivery of CPEC and advised them to engage in dialogue to identify specific business opportunities; leverage British strengths especially in the services sector and take a long term view while making investment decisions in CPEC.

The CPEC is one of the more advanced corridors in China’s ‘One Belt One Road’ initiative, seeking to replicate the ancient Silk Road trade routes with modern trading relationships and investments across Asia, the Middle East and into Europe. It has the potential to transform Pakistan’s economy into one of the most advanced economies in the region.


Geo Tv

Pint of Science set to take latest local science breakthroughs to pubs across Bath (UK)

Tickets have been launched for the world’s largest festival of public science talks, which will see over 24 university scientists take to the stage in pubs across Bath.

The international, three-day Pint of Science festival will see thousands o

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Pint of Science set to take latest local science breakthroughs to pubs across Bath (UK)

Tickets have been launched for the world’s largest festival of public science talks, which will see over 24 university scientists take to the stage in pubs across Bath.

The international, three-day Pint of Science festival will see thousands of scientists simultaneously standing up and telling the public about their research in over 100 cities across 12 countries.

Founded five years ago by two UK researchers, the festival brings a unique line up of talks, demonstrations and live experiments to the nation’s favourite locals.

University of Bath researchers can be caught speaking at various pubs across the city, including Bath Brew House, Bath Function Rooms, The Huntsman, and The Edge University of Bath. Tickets are available from the Pint of Science website (pintofscience.co.uk), with each evening costing only £4.

Attendees in Bath will enjoy a variety of exciting talks including:

Erasing unwanted memories

Living & learning in a connected world

Dancing Robots

Water-fuelled cars? Really?

Alongside the main talks, each evening will also include a range of fun, science-related activities including live experiments, fun quizzes, geeky puzzles, engaging stories and other interactive activities.

The festival kicked off with a National Launch in London on 3rd April, featuring Bath’s own Pint alumni, Dr Saiful Islam (Professor in Chemistry).

A local launch will happen at the University of Bath on 6th May during the Bath 50th anniversary festival.

Debra DeLoach, a postgraduate researcher in the University’s Department of Biology and Biochemistry and this year’s Festival coordinator, said: “Pint of Science is back in Bath for its fourth year – and it’s bigger than ever!

“We’re proud to showcase the fascinating research taking place at the University and are looking forward to engaging others with the love and joy that we for our craft. We hope you join us and fall in love with science too!”

Pint of Science was established five years ago by a group of UK-based postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers. Festival founders Dr Praveen Paul and Dr Michael Motskin wanted to bring back the personal touch to science, giving everyone the chance to meet the real people behind the incredible research taking place in universities across the country.

The duo are amazed by the growth of their idea into a global festival, which has spread to 12 countries around the world.

“Science can often get lost in translation, leading to the spread of pseudo-science and myths. The best way to overcome this is for people to be able to talk to scientists directly in a familiar environment, such as in a pub over a pint”, said Festival co-founder Dr Motskin.

“We are in awe of how big the festival has become over the years, demonstrating the thirst there is to hear science from the source – the scientists.

“The festival gives everyone the chance to pick the brains of some of the UK’s most brilliant academics, breaking down barriers and giving unrivalled access to the people behind the science.”


Bath Echo

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