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How Tight a Job Market Is Too Tight for the Fed?

The labor market is red hot except for wage growth. The Federal Reserve probably won’t have to wait long for more signs that conditions are tight enough to keep raising rates.
WSJ.com: Markets

How Tight a Job Market Is Too Tight for the Fed?

The labor market is red hot except for wage growth. The Federal Reserve probably won’t have to wait long for more signs that conditions are tight enough to keep raising rates.

Brexit Breakthrough Leaves Thorniest Problems for Later

The U.K. is hailing a Brexit breakthrough. It is more a small step toward confronting even bigger political, financial and economic issues.
WSJ.com: Markets

Brexit Breakthrough Leaves Thorniest Problems for Later

The U.K. is hailing a Brexit breakthrough. It is more a small step toward confronting even bigger political, financial and economic issues.

Accounting Blowup at Steinhoff Was Hiding in Plain Sight

Steinhoff had lumps in its mattress long before the 63% plunge in its stock price Wednesday. Lest they suffer another sleepless night, investors should stay up late studying the string of warning signs that preceded an admission of “accounting irregularitie
WSJ.com: Markets

Accounting Blowup at Steinhoff Was Hiding in Plain Sight

Steinhoff had lumps in its mattress long before the 63% plunge in its stock price Wednesday. Lest they suffer another sleepless night, investors should stay up late studying the string of warning signs that preceded an admission of “accounting irregularities” by one of the world’s largest furniture retailers.

Chinese Battery Champion Has Fully Charged IPO

China has the world’s largest market for electric cars and wants its companies to dominate globally when it comes to the batteries that power these vehicles. That makes the initial public offering of a turbocharged player at the center of that effort well w
WSJ.com: Markets

Chinese Battery Champion Has Fully Charged IPO

China has the world’s largest market for electric cars and wants its companies to dominate globally when it comes to the batteries that power these vehicles. That makes the initial public offering of a turbocharged player at the center of that effort well worth watching.

Credit Suisse Decides the Best Target Is One You Can Hit

Tidjane Thiam has learned to be a little more cautious since he took the reins at Credit Suisse. The Swiss bank’s CEO set fresh profit and payout goals its investor day, but the strong share-price reaction is a slight surprise.
WSJ.com: Markets

Credit Suisse Decides the Best Target Is One You Can Hit

Tidjane Thiam has learned to be a little more cautious since he took the reins at Credit Suisse. The Swiss bank’s CEO set fresh profit and payout goals its investor day, but the strong share-price reaction is a slight surprise.

Kroger Investors Cleaning Up in Aisle Five

Supermarket chain Kroger, slammed by Amazon’s entry into the grocery business and other competitive fears, is bouncing back and still looks like a bargain.
WSJ.com: Markets

Kroger Investors Cleaning Up in Aisle Five

Supermarket chain Kroger, slammed by Amazon’s entry into the grocery business and other competitive fears, is bouncing back and still looks like a bargain.

Batteries Are Taking Over the World

The battery industry is mustering for exponential growth as car makers electrify their fleets. But for investors the path to profitability is far from clear, and technological breakthroughs could upset the competitive order.
WSJ.com: Markets

Batteries Are Taking Over the World

The battery industry is mustering for exponential growth as car makers electrify their fleets. But for investors the path to profitability is far from clear, and technological breakthroughs could upset the competitive order.

Investors Must Focus on Big Picture on Black Friday

There is a predictability to Black Friday stories each year, yet there also is a predictability to what they tell us about how stores will do over holidays—not much.
WSJ.com: Markets

Investors Must Focus on Big Picture on Black Friday

There is a predictability to Black Friday stories each year, yet there also is a predictability to what they tell us about how stores will do over holidays—not much.

Commodity Bulls Ignoring a Few Large Elephants

Rising prices for growth-sensitive commodities have been one factor assuaging investors’ fears about richly valued stocks. But investors have been ignoring warning signs in metal and energy markets too.
WSJ.com: Markets

Commodity Bulls Ignoring a Few Large Elephants

Rising prices for growth-sensitive commodities have been one factor assuaging investors’ fears about richly valued stocks. But investors have been ignoring warning signs in metal and energy markets too.

How to Spot a Market Top

With central banks scaling back stimulus in a world filled with money, the current investing nirvana is facing its biggest threat in years. Heard on the Street walks through the risks and likely scenarios for markets in the coming months.
WSJ.com: Markets

How to Spot a Market Top

With central banks scaling back stimulus in a world filled with money, the current investing nirvana is facing its biggest threat in years. Heard on the Street walks through the risks and likely scenarios for markets in the coming months.

New solar cell may be most efficient in the world

Scientists have designed a new solar cell that converts direct sunlight to electricity with 44.5 per cent efficiency, and may potentially be the most efficient solar cell in the world. The prototype integrates multiple cells stacked into a single device c

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New solar cell may be most efficient in the world

Scientists have designed a new solar cell that converts direct sunlight to electricity with 44.5 per cent efficiency, and may potentially be the most efficient solar cell in the world. The prototype integrates multiple cells stacked into a single device capable of capturing nearly all of the energy in the solar spectrum, researchers said. The approach developed by researchers at George Washington University (GWU) in the US is different from the solar panels one might commonly see on rooftops or in fields.

The new device uses concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) panels that employ lenses to concentrate sunlight onto tiny, micro-scale solar cells. Due to their small size - less than one millimetre square - solar cells utilising more sophisticated materials can be developed cost effectively, researchers said. The stacked cell acts almost like a sieve for sunlight, with the specialised materials in each layer absorbing the energy of a specific set of wavelengths.

By the time the light is funnelled through the stack, just under half of the available energy has been converted into electricity. By comparison, the most common solar cell today converts only a quarter of the available energy into electricity. "Around 99 per cent of the power contained in direct sunlight reaching the surface of Earth falls between wavelengths of 250 nanometres (nm) and 2,500 nm, but conventional materials for high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells cannot capture this entire spectral range," said Matthew Lumb, lead author of the study published in the journal Advanced Energy Materials.

"Our new device is able to unlock the energy stored in the long-wavelength photons, which are lost in conventional solar cells, and therefore provides a pathway to realising the ultimate multi-junction solar cell," said Lumb. While scientists have worked towards more efficient solar cells for years, this approach has two novel aspects. First, it uses a family of materials based on gallium antimonide (GaSb) substrates, which are usually found in applications for infra-red lasers and photodetectors.

The novel GaSb-based solar cells are assembled into a stacked structure along with high efficiency solar cells grown on conventional substrates that capture shorter wavelength solar photons. In addition, the stacking procedure uses a technique known as transfer-printing, which enables three dimensional assembly of these tiny devices with a high degree of precision.

This particular solar cell is very expensive, however researchers believe it was important to show the upper limit of what is possible in terms of efficiency. Despite the current costs of the materials involved, the technique used to create the cells shows much promise, researchers said.


DNA India

Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey, reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well.

On Fox and Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey, reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well.

On Fox and Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey "reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well."

On Fox & Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lyn

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey "reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well."

On Fox & Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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On Fox & Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


US News

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Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey "reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well."

On "Fox & Friends" Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Ly

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey "reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well."

On "Fox & Friends" Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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On "Fox & Friends" Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Syria Anti-government propaganda campaign.

The father of a Syrian boy named Omran Daqneesh, whose image is sometimes regarded as a symbol of the Aleppo children’s suffering, revealed that the Syrian militants sought to use his son as tool in their anti-government propaganda campaign.

T

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Syria Anti-government propaganda campaign.

The father of a Syrian boy named Omran Daqneesh, whose image is sometimes regarded as a symbol of the Aleppo children’s suffering, revealed that the Syrian militants sought to use his son as tool in their anti-government propaganda campaign.

The name of Omran Daqneesh became known to the world in August 2016 when some media outlets began circulating footage of a five-year old Syrian child apparently injured in alleged Russian Air Force strike on the rebel-held al-Qaterji neighborhood of Aleppo.

Untroubled by petty concerns of ethics and morality, the Syrian militants rushed to capitalize on this tragedy, using the image of Omran – bloodied, covered in dust and apparently shocked – as ammo in their propaganda campaign against Damascus and its allies, blaming the government of Bashar Assad and Russian combat pilots for the suffering of Aleppo’s children.

The truth, however, turns out to be quite different.

While the militants claimed on several occasions that Omran died of his injuries, the boy is in fact alive and well, living peacefully with his family in the liberated city of Aleppo.

The boy’s father, Mohammad Kheir Daqneesh, told RT correspondents that the militants actually exaggerated the extent of his son’s injuries for the sake of propaganda.

He described how on that tragic day when their house was destroyed and he rushed to rescue his family from the rubble, the so called White Helmets simply stood by and filmed his son in order to make that famous video.

One can only hope that the Syrian militant groups won’t use the suffering of more Syrian children as mere ammo in their ongoing efforts to topple the country’s government.


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The True Story of Omran Daqneesh. Anti-government propaganda campaign.

The father of a Syrian boy named Omran Daqneesh, whose image is sometimes regarded as a symbol of the Aleppo children’s suffering, revealed that the Syrian militants sought to use his son as tool in their anti-government propaganda campaign.

T

Новости - mainAssistant.com

The True Story of Omran Daqneesh. Anti-government propaganda campaign.

The father of a Syrian boy named Omran Daqneesh, whose image is sometimes regarded as a symbol of the Aleppo children’s suffering, revealed that the Syrian militants sought to use his son as tool in their anti-government propaganda campaign.

The name of Omran Daqneesh became known to the world in August 2016 when some media outlets began circulating footage of a five-year old Syrian child apparently injured in alleged Russian Air Force strike on the rebel-held al-Qaterji neighborhood of Aleppo.

Untroubled by petty concerns of ethics and morality, the Syrian militants rushed to capitalize on this tragedy, using the image of Omran – bloodied, covered in dust and apparently shocked – as ammo in their propaganda campaign against Damascus and its allies, blaming the government of Bashar Assad and Russian combat pilots for the suffering of Aleppo’s children.

The truth, however, turns out to be quite different.

While the militants claimed on several occasions that Omran died of his injuries, the boy is in fact alive and well, living peacefully with his family in the liberated city of Aleppo.

The boy’s father, Mohammad Kheir Daqneesh, told RT correspondents that the militants actually exaggerated the extent of his son’s injuries for the sake of propaganda.

He described how on that tragic day when their house was destroyed and he rushed to rescue his family from the rubble, the so called White Helmets simply stood by and filmed his son in order to make that famous video.

One can only hope that the Syrian militant groups won’t use the suffering of more Syrian children as mere ammo in their ongoing efforts to topple the country’s government.


SputnikNews

GlobalNewsCA

NDTV

NewsAU

MetroUK

USA: Thank You Russia to keep Memory !

The Immortal Regiment march was held in almost two dozen cities in the United States on Saturday, with more than 4,000 people taking part in it, member of the Coordinating Council of Russian Compatriots of the USA (KSORS) and President of the Russian Yout

Новости - mainAssistant.com

USA: Thank You Russia to keep Memory !

The Immortal Regiment march was held in almost two dozen cities in the United States on Saturday, with more than 4,000 people taking part in it, member of the Coordinating Council of Russian Compatriots of the USA (KSORS) and President of the Russian Youth of America society, Igor Kochan, said in an interview with TASS.

"About 20 cities took part took part this year compared to seven last year. Literally every major Russian city was covered," he said. Among the cities where the march was held were New York City, Los Angeles (California), Chicago (Illinois), San Francisco (California), Miami (Florida), Washington, DC, Boston (Massachusetts) and Philadelphia (Pennsylvania). Kochan voiced confidence that interest in the KSORS-backed campaign had grown compared to previous years. "In all, more than 4,000 people took part in it, that’s for sure," he noted. "Those were mostly our fellow countrymen, natives of the former Soviet Union."

"It is good to see that more and more Americans take part in this event showing increased interest in it," he added. Among the cities where the event had never been held before, Kochan mentioned Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, Detroit, San Diego, Little Rock (Arkansad), St. Petersburg and Tallahassee (both in Florida). "In some cities, American high school children worked as volunteers helping to organize the march," Kochan said. The Immortal Regiment march was held for the first time in 2012 in Siberia’s Tomsk. In 2013, some Russian, Kazakh and Ukrainian cities joined the campaign. In 2015, the event became nationwide. On May 9, 2015, when the 70th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany was celebrated, the Immortal Regiment marched through the streets of 500 cities across the world with some 12 million people carrying photographs of their ancestors who fought in World War II. Russian President Vladimir Putin joined the march in Moscow with a portrait of his father. That same year it was held for the first time in three American cities on the initiative of the Russian Youth of America society.

Putin urges world to fight terror as Russia marks 72 years since defeating Nazis during WW2

In a letter to Russian President Vladimir Putin on the occasion of Victory Day, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu praised Russia's role in the liberation of Jews as soldiers and military hardware paraded across Red Square in Moscow as the country held its annual pomp-filled celebration of the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945.

Netanyahu congratulated Putin and the Russian people on the 72nd anniversary of the Red Army's "heroic triumph" over Nazi Germany in World War II, writing of its importance in Jewish history as "the end of the systematic annihilation of European Jewry and the liberation of the remaining survivors from the concentration and death camps in Poland and Germany."

"It is hard to imagine what the world would look like today had it not been for the Russian people's incredible sacrifice. Today, millions across the globe gather to salute those brave men and women who fought to free the world of Nazi tyranny."

Netanyahu made special mention of the "hundreds of thousands of Jewish men and women who fought in the ranks of the Soviet Army," and said that veterans living in Israel would march to commemorate Victory Day.

An estimated 27 million of the former Soviet Union's soldiers and civilians were killed in World War II and the Red Army's triumph in the war is viewed as a huge source of pride in Russia.

Putin on Tuesday warned Russia could defeat any aggressors but insisted that the world come together to fight "terrorism".

"The lessons of past war force us to remain alert and the armed forces of Russia are capable of warding off any potential aggression," Putin said as he presided over the parade.

"Today life itself requires us to increase our defensive capability, but for an effective fight against terrorism, extremism, neo-Nazism and other threats it is necessary to consolidate the whole international community."

The Kremlin strongman insisted that Russia was "open for such cooperation" and that Moscow would "always be on the side of the forces of peace and with those who choose the path of equal partnership."

Under Putin, celebrations of the Soviet Union's immense sacrifice in World War II has become a key rallying point for society with authorities fiercely seeking to control the historical narrative.

"This monstrous tragedy was not prevented primarily because the criminal ideology of racial superiority was tolerated, because of the disunity of the world's leading countries," Putin said.

There "is no, there was no, and there will be no force that can conquer our people," he added.

"We will never forget that the freedom of Europe and long-awaited peace across the planet was won namely by our fathers, grandfathers and great-grandfathers."

The Victory Day military parade is also a major chance for Putin to showcase Russia's military might as the country has poured vast sums into bolstering its forces.

In a hiccup, however, organizers said they were forced to cancel the traditional fly-by of helicopters and warplanes over Red Square due "adverse weather conditions" as heavy clouds covered Moscow.

As soldiers paraded in cities across the country, Moscow's forces at its Hmeimim air base in Syria also held a ceremony.

Russia has been pushing for the West to join forces with it in Syria to battle "terrorism" but has faced fierce criticism for backing leader Bashar al-Assad.


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"It is good to see that more and more Americans take part in this event showing increased interest in it," he added. Among the cities where the event had never been held before, Kochan mentioned Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, Detroit, San Diego, Little Rock (Arkansad), St. Petersburg and Tallahassee (both in Florida). "In some cities, American high school children worked as volunteers helping to organize the march," Kochan said. The Immortal Regiment march was held for the first time in 2012 in Siberia’s Tomsk. In 2013, some Russian, Kazakh and Ukrainian cities joined the campaign. In 2015, the event became nationwide. On May 9, 2015, when the 70th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany was celebrated, the Immortal Regiment marched through the streets of 500 cities across the world with some 12 million people carrying photographs of their ancestors who fought in World War II. Russian President Vladimir Putin joined the march in Moscow with a portrait of his father. That same year it was held for the first time in three American cities on the initiative of the Russian Youth of America society.

Putin urges world to fight terror as Russia marks 72 years since defeating Nazis during WW2

In a letter to Russian President Vladimir Putin on the occasion of Victory Day, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu praised Russia's role in the liberation of Jews as soldiers and military hardware paraded across Red Square in Moscow as the country held its annual pomp-filled celebration of the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945.

Netanyahu congratulated Putin and the Russian people on the 72nd anniversary of the Red Army's "heroic triumph" over Nazi Germany in World War II, writing of its importance in Jewish history as "the end of the systematic annihilation of European Jewry and the liberation of the remaining survivors from the concentration and death camps in Poland and Germany."

"It is hard to imagine what the world would look like today had it not been for the Russian people's incredible sacrifice. Today, millions across the globe gather to salute those brave men and women who fought to free the world of Nazi tyranny."

Netanyahu made special mention of the "hundreds of thousands of Jewish men and women who fought in the ranks of the Soviet Army," and said that veterans living in Israel would march to commemorate Victory Day.

An estimated 27 million of the former Soviet Union's soldiers and civilians were killed in World War II and the Red Army's triumph in the war is viewed as a huge source of pride in Russia.

Putin on Tuesday warned Russia could defeat any aggressors but insisted that the world come together to fight "terrorism".

"The lessons of past war force us to remain alert and the armed forces of Russia are capable of warding off any potential aggression," Putin said as he presided over the parade.

"Today life itself requires us to increase our defensive capability, but for an effective fight against terrorism, extremism, neo-Nazism and other threats it is necessary to consolidate the whole international community."

The Kremlin strongman insisted that Russia was "open for such cooperation" and that Moscow would "always be on the side of the forces of peace and with those who choose the path of equal partnership."

Under Putin, celebrations of the Soviet Union's immense sacrifice in World War II has become a key rallying point for society with authorities fiercely seeking to control the historical narrative.

"This monstrous tragedy was not prevented primarily because the criminal ideology of racial superiority was tolerated, because of the disunity of the world's leading countries," Putin said.

There "is no, there was no, and there will be no force that can conquer our people," he added.

"We will never forget that the freedom of Europe and long-awaited peace across the planet was won namely by our fathers, grandfathers and great-grandfathers."

The Victory Day military parade is also a major chance for Putin to showcase Russia's military might as the country has poured vast sums into bolstering its forces.

In a hiccup, however, organizers said they were forced to cancel the traditional fly-by of helicopters and warplanes over Red Square due "adverse weather conditions" as heavy clouds covered Moscow.

As soldiers paraded in cities across the country, Moscow's forces at its Hmeimim air base in Syria also held a ceremony.

Russia has been pushing for the West to join forces with it in Syria to battle "terrorism" but has faced fierce criticism for backing leader Bashar al-Assad.


Sources:


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Latest News on Trump Administration

Secret Service costs for Trump family protection continue to mount.

With Eric Trump’s trip to the United Kingdom this week, the international hotel and car rental costs for the Secret Service agents who protect him and his brother Donald Trum

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Latest News on Trump Administration

Secret Service costs for Trump family protection continue to mount.

With Eric Trump’s trip to the United Kingdom this week, the international hotel and car rental costs for the Secret Service agents who protect him and his brother Donald Trump Jr. have topped $190,000 since January 1st, according to a review of purchasing orders by CBS News. Mike Pence heads to South Korea Saturday amid North Korea tensions.

Vice President Mike Pence will leave Washington on Saturday for an 11-day trip overseas with his first stop in South Korea as North Korea appears to prepare for another nuclear test. Do Americans think their tax system is fair?

As Americans prepare to file their income taxes this year, most see unfairness in the current tax system: 56 percent describe the income tax system as somewhat or quite unfair, while just over a third -- 37 percent -- think it’s quite or reasonably fair. “The Takeout” - Bob Schieffer on Trump’s move toward centrist policies.

Legendary CBS News correspondent and former “Face the Nation” moderator Bob Schieffer is the first to acknowledge he has never seen anything like the 2016 presidential campaign.

“You know, that became a drinking game among the younger people,” he said on the latest episode of The Takeout podcast. “Every time I said that on television, they had to take a shot.” Schedule

The president is in Mar-a-Lago for the Easter weekend with no public events today.

CIA director calls WikiLeaks Russia-aided “non-state hostile intelligence service”.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo blasted WikiLeaks Thursday as a “hostile” intelligence service often aided by questionable actors like Russia. Trump, Spicer won’t say if president specifically authorized “mother of all bombs”.

President Trump didn’t say Thursday whether he specifically authorized the use of the “mother of all bombs” in Afghanistan hours earlier, simply remarking his White House has given the military “total authorization.” George W. Bush on “poncho” incident, response to inauguration.

Former President George W. Bush says he can’t remember if he said “that was some weird s***” after President Trump’s inauguration speech in January. Russians laugh off idea that Putin interfered in U.S. election.

What happens when you ask Russians about the Kremlin interfering in the U.S. presidential election? Dismissive finger flicks, eye rolls and laughter. Trump reverses Obama-era rule on Planned Parenthood, abortion provider funding.

President Trump signed legislation Thursday allowing states to withhold federal family planning funds from Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers. Kitchen at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago had several health code violations, inspectors found.

Restaurant inspectors recently found several health code violations in the kitchen at President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, including undercooked meat and subpar hand-washing practices among employees. VA hospital in Washington, D.C. criticized for unsanitary conditions, poor management.

Subpar conditions at a Washington, D.C., VA medical center have prompted a scathing report from the agency’s inspector general and the dismissal of the hospital’s director.


CBS News

Russia vetoes UN Security Council resolution on alleged chemical attack in Syria

Russia vetoed on Wednesday the resolution condemning the alleged chemical attack in the Syrian town of Khan-Sheikhoun on April 4 and demanding from Damascus to present information on its sorties on that day. The West-drafted resolution was supported by te

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Russia vetoes UN Security Council resolution on alleged chemical attack in Syria

Russia vetoed on Wednesday the resolution condemning the alleged chemical attack in the Syrian town of Khan-Sheikhoun on April 4 and demanding from Damascus to present information on its sorties on that day. The West-drafted resolution was supported by ten votes at the UN Security Council, which forced Moscow to veto it.

Bolivia voted against the resolution alongside Russia, while Kazakhstan, China and Ethiopia abstained.

"The draft resolution has not been adopted owing to the negative vote of a permanent member of Council," US Ambassador and current Security Council President Nikki Haley said.

Drafted by the US, UK and France, the resolution is a slightly revised version of previous similar document. It denounces "the reported use of chemical weapons in the [Syria], in particular the attack on Khan Shaykhun."

The document also urged the Syrian government to comply with recommendations of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Fact Finding Mission and the OPCW-UN Joint Investigative Mechanism (JIM) and provide access to the military bases from which strikes against Khan Shaykhun could be carried out.

The resolution also calls on the Syrian government to cooperate fully with the international investigators, including by providing them with "flight plans, flight logs, and any other information on air operations, including all flight plans or flight logs filed on April 4 2017."

If adopted, the resolution would have enjoined Damascus to submit the "names of all individuals in command of any helicopter squadrons," organize meetings with them and ensure access to relevant air bases from which the JIM or the FFM believe attacks involving chemicals as weapons may have been launched. Besides, the resolution also threatened Syria with sanctions and the use of military force under Chapter VII of the UN Charter given toxic chemicals had been used.

The news agency Reuters reported on April 4, citing the London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights that an air strike by Syrian or Russian jets had allegedly killed 58 people, including 11 children, and wounded 300 in the town of Khan-Shaykhun. As Reuters said, the air strike could have been carried out by the Syrian government forces in a suspected gas attack.

The Russian and the Syrian military have rejected their involvement in the attack.

Following an order of US President Donald Trump, the US military fired 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles from its warships in the Mediterranean on an air base in the Syrian Homs Governorate in early hours of April 7. The missile strike came as a response to the chemical attack in Idlib on April 4 and targeted what Washington claims was a starting location for the attack.

According to the Russian Defense Ministry’s data, the Syrian aircraft hit workshops on April 4 where terrorists were producing munitions with chemical agents supplied to Iraq and used in Aleppo.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Moscow considered the US missile strikes on the air base in Homs as an aggression against a sovereign state.


TASS

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Drafted by the US, UK and France, the resolution is a slightly revised version of previous similar document. It denounces "the reported use of chemical weapons in the [Syria], in particular the attack on Khan Shaykhun."

The document also urged the Syrian government to comply with recommendations of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Fact Finding Mission and the OPCW-UN Joint Investigative Mechanism (JIM) and provide access to the military bases from which strikes against Khan Shaykhun could be carried out.

The resolution also calls on the Syrian government to cooperate fully with the international investigators, including by providing them with "flight plans, flight logs, and any other information on air operations, including all flight plans or flight logs filed on April 4 2017."

If adopted, the resolution would have enjoined Damascus to submit the "names of all individuals in command of any helicopter squadrons," organize meetings with them and ensure access to relevant air bases from which the JIM or the FFM believe attacks involving chemicals as weapons may have been launched. Besides, the resolution also threatened Syria with sanctions and the use of military force under Chapter VII of the UN Charter given toxic chemicals had been used.

The news agency Reuters reported on April 4, citing the London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights that an air strike by Syrian or Russian jets had allegedly killed 58 people, including 11 children, and wounded 300 in the town of Khan-Shaykhun. As Reuters said, the air strike could have been carried out by the Syrian government forces in a suspected gas attack.

The Russian and the Syrian military have rejected their involvement in the attack.

Following an order of US President Donald Trump, the US military fired 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles from its warships in the Mediterranean on an air base in the Syrian Homs Governorate in early hours of April 7. The missile strike came as a response to the chemical attack in Idlib on April 4 and targeted what Washington claims was a starting location for the attack.

According to the Russian Defense Ministry’s data, the Syrian aircraft hit workshops on April 4 where terrorists were producing munitions with chemical agents supplied to Iraq and used in Aleppo.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Moscow considered the US missile strikes on the air base in Homs as an aggression against a sovereign state.


TASS

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Leaders scramble for votes on California gas tax

Democratic legislative leaders are hopeful but making no promises as they prepare to vote on a $5 billion-a-year boost in California's gas and vehicle taxes to pay for road repairs.

Senate leader Kevin de Leon says talks are fluid but "ver

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Leaders scramble for votes on California gas tax

Democratic legislative leaders are hopeful but making no promises as they prepare to vote on a $5 billion-a-year boost in California's gas and vehicle taxes to pay for road repairs.

Senate leader Kevin de Leon says talks are fluid but "very fruitful as of now."

He and other leaders including Gov. Jerry Brown are hurrying to line up the two-thirds votes needed to pass the tax increases. Democrats have the supermajorities, but are lobbying some reluctant members.

Republicans say the state already has enough money but Democrats who control state government have spent it poorly.

Votes are planned on the bill Thursday afternoon before lawmakers adjourn for their weeklong spring break.


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