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NATO film glorifying Nazi collaborators

Several Russian officials and politicians, including the foreign ministry spokesperson, criticized a documentary about the ‘Forest Brothers’ – pro-Nazi guerillas from the Baltic nations – recently released by NATO.

“I remember that 6

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NATO film glorifying Nazi collaborators

Several Russian officials and politicians, including the foreign ministry spokesperson, criticized a documentary about the ‘Forest Brothers’ – pro-Nazi guerillas from the Baltic nations – recently released by NATO.

“I remember that 6 months ago the international community, including the leading mass media, was discussing whether Holocaust-themed dance shows should be allowed. I have a strong hope that these same people who claim that they care a lot about the tragic pages of history will also give their appraisal to this appalling stunt by NATO. I also hope that no one needs a reminder concerning mass executions performed by those who later started calling themselves Forest Brothers,” Russian Foreign Ministry spokesperson Maria Zakharova wrote on her Facebook page.

The reaction came to the eight-minute reenactment film ‘Forest Brothers – Fight for the Baltics’ which was released by NATO. The film glorifies guerillas who fought against the Soviet regime in the Baltic countries, and depicts an ambush in which some Forest Brothers attacked and killed Soviet soldiers.

Zakharova called upon historians, reporters, and political scientists not to remain indifferent to this new attempt of distorting history. “Don’t remain indifferent, this is a perversion of history that NATO knowingly spreads in order to undermine the outcome of the Nuremberg Tribunal and it must be cut short!” she wrote. She also reminded her readers that many of the Forest Brothers were former Nazi collaborators and members of the Baltic Waffen SS, and that members of these guerilla groups killed thousands of civilians in their raids.

Russian deputy PM and former envoy to NATO Dmitry Rogozin was even harsher in his reaction to the film: “This reel with Forest Brothers killing our soldiers confirms the fact that when we face NATO we face the heirs to those of Hitler’s collaborators who survived the war,” he tweeted. The official noted that some time ago, when he worked as a plenipotentiary with NATO, such things would not have been allowed, but now “their insolence has reached the limit.”

Lower House MP Iosif Kobzon (United Russia) called the NATO film “vandalism and Russophobia,” adding that he was ready to propose the making of a film that would describe the story of the Forest Brothers movement in a more realistic light. He also recommended everyone watch the 1965 documentary ‘Triumph Over Violence’ by Soviet director Mikhail Romm, which describes in detail the atrocities committed by the Nazis and their allies and collaborators.

‘Forest Brothers’ is the unofficial name for guerilla units that offered armed resistance to the Soviet authorities in the three Baltic republics – Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia – from the late 1940s to the late 1950s. These guerilla groups killed at least 25,000 people in Lithuania alone, most of them civilians.

After the Baltic nations declared independence from the Soviet Union in early 1990, nationalist politicians in these countries began frequently using the images of Forest Brothers and Waffen SS veterans in their propaganda, depicting the Nazi collaborators as patriots who fought the Soviet regime. Russia has repeatedly denounced such moves as rewriting history and warned of the possible dire consequences of justifying Nazism.


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Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey, reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well.

On Fox and Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch

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Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey, reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well.

On Fox and Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey "reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well."

On Fox & Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lyn

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Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey "reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well."

On Fox & Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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On Fox & Friends, Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey "reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well."

On "Fox & Friends" Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Ly

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Conway Says Comey Testimony Bad for Lynch

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says testimony from former FBI Director James Comey "reflected very poorly on members of the Obama administration as well."

On "Fox & Friends" Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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On "Fox & Friends" Monday, Conway noted Comey's testimony that Loretta Lynch, as President Barack Obama's attorney general, directed him to describe the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton's email practices as a "matter" and to avoid calling it an investigation.

Conway stressed that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California has said there should be further investigation.

Conway also said Comey's testimony showed President Donald Trump was not under investigation.

Comey testified that the FBI investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign did not extend to Trump himself during the time Comey was leading the FBI. That investigation continues, as do congressional inquiries.

President Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, says her father felt "vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following fired FBI Director James Comey's congressional testimony last week.

In an interview Monday on Fox News' "Fox & Friends," Ivanka Trump says political life still surprises her and that "there is a level of viciousness I was not expecting."

When asked what she thought of Comey's testimony, in which he said Trump suggested he drop a probe into former National Security adviser Michael Flynn's Russia contacts, Ivanka Trump said her father felt "very vindicated...and feels incredibly optimistic."

She added: "With all the noise, with all the intensity of the media coverage and obviously what makes headlines, ultimately we're really focused on why the American people elected Donald Trump as their president." She said she's trying to keep her focus on helping her father change the status quo.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. It's part of an escalating investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections.

Sessions is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence committee and was due for sharp questioning. It is not yet known whether the hearing will be public or closed.

Fellow Republicans, meanwhile, pressed Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey and provide them to Congress if he does — or possibly face a subpoena.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Syria Anti-government propaganda campaign.

The father of a Syrian boy named Omran Daqneesh, whose image is sometimes regarded as a symbol of the Aleppo children’s suffering, revealed that the Syrian militants sought to use his son as tool in their anti-government propaganda campaign.

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Syria Anti-government propaganda campaign.

The father of a Syrian boy named Omran Daqneesh, whose image is sometimes regarded as a symbol of the Aleppo children’s suffering, revealed that the Syrian militants sought to use his son as tool in their anti-government propaganda campaign.

The name of Omran Daqneesh became known to the world in August 2016 when some media outlets began circulating footage of a five-year old Syrian child apparently injured in alleged Russian Air Force strike on the rebel-held al-Qaterji neighborhood of Aleppo.

Untroubled by petty concerns of ethics and morality, the Syrian militants rushed to capitalize on this tragedy, using the image of Omran – bloodied, covered in dust and apparently shocked – as ammo in their propaganda campaign against Damascus and its allies, blaming the government of Bashar Assad and Russian combat pilots for the suffering of Aleppo’s children.

The truth, however, turns out to be quite different.

While the militants claimed on several occasions that Omran died of his injuries, the boy is in fact alive and well, living peacefully with his family in the liberated city of Aleppo.

The boy’s father, Mohammad Kheir Daqneesh, told RT correspondents that the militants actually exaggerated the extent of his son’s injuries for the sake of propaganda.

He described how on that tragic day when their house was destroyed and he rushed to rescue his family from the rubble, the so called White Helmets simply stood by and filmed his son in order to make that famous video.

One can only hope that the Syrian militant groups won’t use the suffering of more Syrian children as mere ammo in their ongoing efforts to topple the country’s government.


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The True Story of Omran Daqneesh. Anti-government propaganda campaign.

The father of a Syrian boy named Omran Daqneesh, whose image is sometimes regarded as a symbol of the Aleppo children’s suffering, revealed that the Syrian militants sought to use his son as tool in their anti-government propaganda campaign.

T

Новости - mainAssistant.com

The True Story of Omran Daqneesh. Anti-government propaganda campaign.

The father of a Syrian boy named Omran Daqneesh, whose image is sometimes regarded as a symbol of the Aleppo children’s suffering, revealed that the Syrian militants sought to use his son as tool in their anti-government propaganda campaign.

The name of Omran Daqneesh became known to the world in August 2016 when some media outlets began circulating footage of a five-year old Syrian child apparently injured in alleged Russian Air Force strike on the rebel-held al-Qaterji neighborhood of Aleppo.

Untroubled by petty concerns of ethics and morality, the Syrian militants rushed to capitalize on this tragedy, using the image of Omran – bloodied, covered in dust and apparently shocked – as ammo in their propaganda campaign against Damascus and its allies, blaming the government of Bashar Assad and Russian combat pilots for the suffering of Aleppo’s children.

The truth, however, turns out to be quite different.

While the militants claimed on several occasions that Omran died of his injuries, the boy is in fact alive and well, living peacefully with his family in the liberated city of Aleppo.

The boy’s father, Mohammad Kheir Daqneesh, told RT correspondents that the militants actually exaggerated the extent of his son’s injuries for the sake of propaganda.

He described how on that tragic day when their house was destroyed and he rushed to rescue his family from the rubble, the so called White Helmets simply stood by and filmed his son in order to make that famous video.

One can only hope that the Syrian militant groups won’t use the suffering of more Syrian children as mere ammo in their ongoing efforts to topple the country’s government.


SputnikNews

GlobalNewsCA

NDTV

NewsAU

MetroUK

Julian Assange to request political asylum in France

Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, intends to ask France a political asylum, his attorney Juan Branco said in the France Info radio live.

"I think France should be conscientious about this issue and offer Assange political asylum," the la

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Julian Assange to request political asylum in France

Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, intends to ask France a political asylum, his attorney Juan Branco said in the France Info radio live.

"I think France should be conscientious about this issue and offer Assange political asylum," the lawyer said.

"He now wants to leave the Embassy of Ecuador in London and request France for an appropriate motion to offer him asylum in order to protect him from US prosecution," the lawyer stated.

According to Branco, his client has good reason to believe he will be extradited to the US the moment he leaves the embassy. "There were threats to hand Julian Assange a life sentence, even from Donald Trump himself a few weeks ago," the lawyer explained.

Earlier in 2015, Assange sent an open letter to then-president of France Francois Hollande asking for political asylum. Among other things, the WikiLeaks founder said that his further stay in the embassy, where he was confined since 2012, constituted a danger to his physical and moral health.

The Elysee Palace declined Assange’s request then. For now, the lawyer said, all that is left is the hope that the position of current French President Emmanuel Macron will turn out to be different.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has given a public statement after rape allegations made against him were dropped by Swedish prosecutors on Friday. Assange sought political asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London in 2012 and has been living there since, fearing subsequent extradition to America.

“Today is an important victory for me, and for the UN human rights system. But it by no means erases seven years of detention without charge – in prison, under house arrest, and almost five years here in this embassy without sunlight," he told press outside the embassy.

“Seven years without charge, while my children grew up without me. That is not something that I can forgive, it is not something that I can forget.

“The inevitable inquiry into what has occurred in this moment of terrible injustice is something that I hope will be more than just about me, and this situation, because the reality is, detention and extradition without charge has become a feature of the EU.

“A feature which has been exploited, yes, in my case, for political reasons, but for other cases have subjected many people to terrible injustices.”

Assange says that while “today was an important victory, an important vindication,” the “war is far from over.”

He says that while the UK has said it will arrest him, and the US has said he and other WikiLeaks staff have no rights and that his arrest is a priority, “WikiLeaks will continue publication.”

Assange added that he is happy to engage with the US Justice Department.

“While US has made extremely threatening remarks, always happy to engage in dialogue over what has occurred.”

He added: “My staff, my legal staff, have contacted the UK authorities and we hope to engage in a dialogue about what is the best way forward.”

“To some extent the UK has been exploited by the process it entered into with the EU, where it agreed to extradite people without charge.

“That is to an extend a forced position the UK has been put into. And, the first part of that is over. The UK refuses to confirm or deny at this stage whether a US extradition warrant is in the UK territory.”

Assange thanked “Ecuador, its people and its asylum system. They have stood by my asylum in the face of intense pressure.”

Assange also addressed the release of Channing Manning.

“We have had an even more important victory this week [and] that is the release of Chelsea Manning after seven years in military prison.”


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"He now wants to leave the Embassy of Ecuador in London and request France for an appropriate motion to offer him asylum in order to protect him from US prosecution," the lawyer stated.

According to Branco, his client has good reason to believe he will be extradited to the US the moment he leaves the embassy. "There were threats to hand Julian Assange a life sentence, even from Donald Trump himself a few weeks ago," the lawyer explained.

Earlier in 2015, Assange sent an open letter to then-president of France Francois Hollande asking for political asylum. Among other things, the WikiLeaks founder said that his further stay in the embassy, where he was confined since 2012, constituted a danger to his physical and moral health.

The Elysee Palace declined Assange’s request then. For now, the lawyer said, all that is left is the hope that the position of current French President Emmanuel Macron will turn out to be different.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has given a public statement after rape allegations made against him were dropped by Swedish prosecutors on Friday. Assange sought political asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London in 2012 and has been living there since, fearing subsequent extradition to America.

“Today is an important victory for me, and for the UN human rights system. But it by no means erases seven years of detention without charge – in prison, under house arrest, and almost five years here in this embassy without sunlight," he told press outside the embassy.

“Seven years without charge, while my children grew up without me. That is not something that I can forgive, it is not something that I can forget.

“The inevitable inquiry into what has occurred in this moment of terrible injustice is something that I hope will be more than just about me, and this situation, because the reality is, detention and extradition without charge has become a feature of the EU.

“A feature which has been exploited, yes, in my case, for political reasons, but for other cases have subjected many people to terrible injustices.”

Assange says that while “today was an important victory, an important vindication,” the “war is far from over.”

He says that while the UK has said it will arrest him, and the US has said he and other WikiLeaks staff have no rights and that his arrest is a priority, “WikiLeaks will continue publication.”

Assange added that he is happy to engage with the US Justice Department.

“While US has made extremely threatening remarks, always happy to engage in dialogue over what has occurred.”

He added: “My staff, my legal staff, have contacted the UK authorities and we hope to engage in a dialogue about what is the best way forward.”

“To some extent the UK has been exploited by the process it entered into with the EU, where it agreed to extradite people without charge.

“That is to an extend a forced position the UK has been put into. And, the first part of that is over. The UK refuses to confirm or deny at this stage whether a US extradition warrant is in the UK territory.”

Assange thanked “Ecuador, its people and its asylum system. They have stood by my asylum in the face of intense pressure.”

Assange also addressed the release of Channing Manning.

“We have had an even more important victory this week [and] that is the release of Chelsea Manning after seven years in military prison.”


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G7 summit to discuss Nort Korea

Italian Premier Paolo Gentiloni says the G-7 summit his country is hosting later this month will discuss how to deal with the risk North Korea's missile launchings pose to global security.

Gentiloni, who is visiting China and Russia this we

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G7 summit to discuss Nort Korea

Italian Premier Paolo Gentiloni says the G-7 summit his country is hosting later this month will discuss how to deal with the risk North Korea's missile launchings pose to global security.

Gentiloni, who is visiting China and Russia this week, recommended a response of "firmness," which he suggested should be "predominantly economic." He urged an approach of diplomacy, noting that Italy could play a role since it heads the U.N. sanctions committee.

Referring to North Korea's latest ballistic missile test, conducted on Sunday, Gentiloni said in Beijing that "you must not consider these things as local bizarreness or strangeness."

The Italian leader said that "it's a serious problem for global stability and security, and I'm convinced that the upcoming G-7, in friendship, will contribute to resolving this issue."

China's foreign ministry has expressed opposition to North Korea's test-launch of a ballistic missile and called on all sides to exercise restraint.

A Ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunying, said in a statement Sunday faxed to The Associated Press that the situation on the Korean peninsula is "complex and sensitive."

Hua says countries "should not do things that further escalate tensions in the region."

In Beijing, Chinese President Xi Jinping told his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin that their countries are both playing an "important role as a balancing power" in world affairs by seeking a peaceful way out for of the crises in Syria and the Korean Peninsula.

China, North Korea's most important ally and key provider of food and fuel aid, has sought to cool tensions over Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programs, repeatedly calling for dialogue.

Shen Dingli, a professor of international relations at Fudan University in Shanghai, says North Korea conducted the test to show its "determination to develop nuclear weapons and missiles remains unchanged."

Japan's Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida says he and his South Korean counterpart have agreed that dialogue for dialogue's sake with North Korea is meaningless in the wake of Pyongyang's latest missile test.

Kishida says he and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se shared the view that dialogue is important for resolving the North Korean tensions. They also acknowledged the importance of the role China is playing in its dealings with its North Korean ally.

Kishida says the international community should prioritize efforts to implement the existing U.N. Security Council resolutions barring North Korea's missile and nuclear technology more thoroughly. He says Japan and the U.S. also started discussing the sanctions on North Korea, but did not elaborate.

Experts have said the sanctions have been largely ineffective because North Korea still has trade and investment with China and Russia.

Kishida says: "We need to keep studying what could be the most effective while monitoring how North Korea would respond."

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he and South Korean President Moon Jae-in discussed by phone North Korea's latest missile test, while his top national security adviser also spoke with his U.S. counterpart.

Abe says "Japan is closely cooperating with the U.S. and South Korea and analyzing the situation as we firmly respond to the development."

It was his second appearance before reporters Sunday after North Korea fired the missile that Japanese officials say may have been a new type given its flight time and unusually high altitude.

Abe added that the three countries also seek to cooperate with China and Russia to pressure North Korea to comply with U.N. Security Council resolutions to stop further missile and nuclear tests.

The White House says President Donald Trump "cannot imagine that Russia is pleased" with North Korea's latest missile test because the missile landed so close to Russian soil.

In a statement issued Saturday night, the White House press secretary points out that the missile landed closer to Russia than to Japan.

The White House says North Korea has been "a flagrant menace for far too long." And it says South Korea and Japan have been watching this situation closely with the U.S.

The statement says the U.S. maintains its "ironclad commitment" to stand with its allies in the face of the serious threat posed by North Korea. And the White House says the latest "provocation" should serve as a call for all nations to implement far stronger sanctions against the North.

Japan's defense minister says the missile test-fired by North Korea might have been a new type given the altitude and duration of its flight.

Defense Minister Tomomi Inada told reporters there is a possibility that it was a new type of ballistic missile, saying it flew Sunday for about 30 minutes and an altitude exceeding 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles). She says more analysis was needed.

Earlier, Japanese officials said the missile landed in the Sea of Japan but outside the country's exclusive economic zone.

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in has strongly condemned the launch, saying there was still the possibility of dialogue with North Korea but that Seoul would deal sternly with any such provocations.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in has strongly condemned rival North Korea's missile test-launch as a "clear" violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions and a "serious challenge" to international peace and security.

According to senior presidential secretary Yoon Young-chan, Moon expressed "deep regret" over the fact this "provocation" occurred just days after a new government was sworn in in South Korea.

Yoon quoted Moon as saying South Korea is "leaving open the possibility of dialogue with North Korea, but we should sternly deal with a provocation to prevent North Korea from miscalculating."

Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga says the missile test-fired by North Korea flew 800 kilometers (500 miles) for about 30 minutes and landed in the Sea of Japan, but not inside Japan's exclusive economic zone.

He says there are no reports indicating there was any safety impact on aircraft and ship transport.

He says the missile was not flying toward Japan and that the country did not launch a safety alert system.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told reporters Sunday that the launch, which is banned by the United Nations, is "absolutely unacceptable" and that Japan will respond resolutely.

He says officials are studying possible implications of the launch that came days after South Korea's new president took office and an international conference is being hosted by China.

Japan also lodged protest to North Korea over the missile launch through the Japanese Embassy in Beijing.


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Referring to North Korea's latest ballistic missile test, conducted on Sunday, Gentiloni said in Beijing that "you must not consider these things as local bizarreness or strangeness."

The Italian leader said that "it's a serious problem for global stability and security, and I'm convinced that the upcoming G-7, in friendship, will contribute to resolving this issue."

China's foreign ministry has expressed opposition to North Korea's test-launch of a ballistic missile and called on all sides to exercise restraint.

A Ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunying, said in a statement Sunday faxed to The Associated Press that the situation on the Korean peninsula is "complex and sensitive."

Hua says countries "should not do things that further escalate tensions in the region."

In Beijing, Chinese President Xi Jinping told his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin that their countries are both playing an "important role as a balancing power" in world affairs by seeking a peaceful way out for of the crises in Syria and the Korean Peninsula.

China, North Korea's most important ally and key provider of food and fuel aid, has sought to cool tensions over Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programs, repeatedly calling for dialogue.

Shen Dingli, a professor of international relations at Fudan University in Shanghai, says North Korea conducted the test to show its "determination to develop nuclear weapons and missiles remains unchanged."

Japan's Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida says he and his South Korean counterpart have agreed that dialogue for dialogue's sake with North Korea is meaningless in the wake of Pyongyang's latest missile test.

Kishida says he and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se shared the view that dialogue is important for resolving the North Korean tensions. They also acknowledged the importance of the role China is playing in its dealings with its North Korean ally.

Kishida says the international community should prioritize efforts to implement the existing U.N. Security Council resolutions barring North Korea's missile and nuclear technology more thoroughly. He says Japan and the U.S. also started discussing the sanctions on North Korea, but did not elaborate.

Experts have said the sanctions have been largely ineffective because North Korea still has trade and investment with China and Russia.

Kishida says: "We need to keep studying what could be the most effective while monitoring how North Korea would respond."

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he and South Korean President Moon Jae-in discussed by phone North Korea's latest missile test, while his top national security adviser also spoke with his U.S. counterpart.

Abe says "Japan is closely cooperating with the U.S. and South Korea and analyzing the situation as we firmly respond to the development."

It was his second appearance before reporters Sunday after North Korea fired the missile that Japanese officials say may have been a new type given its flight time and unusually high altitude.

Abe added that the three countries also seek to cooperate with China and Russia to pressure North Korea to comply with U.N. Security Council resolutions to stop further missile and nuclear tests.

The White House says President Donald Trump "cannot imagine that Russia is pleased" with North Korea's latest missile test because the missile landed so close to Russian soil.

In a statement issued Saturday night, the White House press secretary points out that the missile landed closer to Russia than to Japan.

The White House says North Korea has been "a flagrant menace for far too long." And it says South Korea and Japan have been watching this situation closely with the U.S.

The statement says the U.S. maintains its "ironclad commitment" to stand with its allies in the face of the serious threat posed by North Korea. And the White House says the latest "provocation" should serve as a call for all nations to implement far stronger sanctions against the North.

Japan's defense minister says the missile test-fired by North Korea might have been a new type given the altitude and duration of its flight.

Defense Minister Tomomi Inada told reporters there is a possibility that it was a new type of ballistic missile, saying it flew Sunday for about 30 minutes and an altitude exceeding 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles). She says more analysis was needed.

Earlier, Japanese officials said the missile landed in the Sea of Japan but outside the country's exclusive economic zone.

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in has strongly condemned the launch, saying there was still the possibility of dialogue with North Korea but that Seoul would deal sternly with any such provocations.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in has strongly condemned rival North Korea's missile test-launch as a "clear" violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions and a "serious challenge" to international peace and security.

According to senior presidential secretary Yoon Young-chan, Moon expressed "deep regret" over the fact this "provocation" occurred just days after a new government was sworn in in South Korea.

Yoon quoted Moon as saying South Korea is "leaving open the possibility of dialogue with North Korea, but we should sternly deal with a provocation to prevent North Korea from miscalculating."

Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga says the missile test-fired by North Korea flew 800 kilometers (500 miles) for about 30 minutes and landed in the Sea of Japan, but not inside Japan's exclusive economic zone.

He says there are no reports indicating there was any safety impact on aircraft and ship transport.

He says the missile was not flying toward Japan and that the country did not launch a safety alert system.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told reporters Sunday that the launch, which is banned by the United Nations, is "absolutely unacceptable" and that Japan will respond resolutely.

He says officials are studying possible implications of the launch that came days after South Korea's new president took office and an international conference is being hosted by China.

Japan also lodged protest to North Korea over the missile launch through the Japanese Embassy in Beijing.


NZ Herald

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Latest News on Trump Administration

Secret Service costs for Trump family protection continue to mount.

With Eric Trump’s trip to the United Kingdom this week, the international hotel and car rental costs for the Secret Service agents who protect him and his brother Donald Trum

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Latest News on Trump Administration

Secret Service costs for Trump family protection continue to mount.

With Eric Trump’s trip to the United Kingdom this week, the international hotel and car rental costs for the Secret Service agents who protect him and his brother Donald Trump Jr. have topped $190,000 since January 1st, according to a review of purchasing orders by CBS News. Mike Pence heads to South Korea Saturday amid North Korea tensions.

Vice President Mike Pence will leave Washington on Saturday for an 11-day trip overseas with his first stop in South Korea as North Korea appears to prepare for another nuclear test. Do Americans think their tax system is fair?

As Americans prepare to file their income taxes this year, most see unfairness in the current tax system: 56 percent describe the income tax system as somewhat or quite unfair, while just over a third -- 37 percent -- think it’s quite or reasonably fair. “The Takeout” - Bob Schieffer on Trump’s move toward centrist policies.

Legendary CBS News correspondent and former “Face the Nation” moderator Bob Schieffer is the first to acknowledge he has never seen anything like the 2016 presidential campaign.

“You know, that became a drinking game among the younger people,” he said on the latest episode of The Takeout podcast. “Every time I said that on television, they had to take a shot.” Schedule

The president is in Mar-a-Lago for the Easter weekend with no public events today.

CIA director calls WikiLeaks Russia-aided “non-state hostile intelligence service”.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo blasted WikiLeaks Thursday as a “hostile” intelligence service often aided by questionable actors like Russia. Trump, Spicer won’t say if president specifically authorized “mother of all bombs”.

President Trump didn’t say Thursday whether he specifically authorized the use of the “mother of all bombs” in Afghanistan hours earlier, simply remarking his White House has given the military “total authorization.” George W. Bush on “poncho” incident, response to inauguration.

Former President George W. Bush says he can’t remember if he said “that was some weird s***” after President Trump’s inauguration speech in January. Russians laugh off idea that Putin interfered in U.S. election.

What happens when you ask Russians about the Kremlin interfering in the U.S. presidential election? Dismissive finger flicks, eye rolls and laughter. Trump reverses Obama-era rule on Planned Parenthood, abortion provider funding.

President Trump signed legislation Thursday allowing states to withhold federal family planning funds from Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers. Kitchen at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago had several health code violations, inspectors found.

Restaurant inspectors recently found several health code violations in the kitchen at President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, including undercooked meat and subpar hand-washing practices among employees. VA hospital in Washington, D.C. criticized for unsanitary conditions, poor management.

Subpar conditions at a Washington, D.C., VA medical center have prompted a scathing report from the agency’s inspector general and the dismissal of the hospital’s director.


CBS News

Chemical attack blame game failed at Syria conference in Brussels

Attempts by some members of the Brussels conference on Syria to redraw the agenda and focus on allegations of the Syrian government’s complicity in the suspected chemical attack in Idlib have failed, Russia’s deputy foreign minister has said.

Новости - mainAssistant.com

Chemical attack blame game failed at Syria conference in Brussels

Attempts by some members of the Brussels conference on Syria to redraw the agenda and focus on allegations of the Syrian government’s complicity in the suspected chemical attack in Idlib have failed, Russia’s deputy foreign minister has said.

“In what concerns this conference, of course, some tried to redirect it in order to focus attention on the incident that has occurred [in Idlib]. I must say that they failed to achieve that,” said Gennady Gatilov, Russia’s representative at the UN-sponsored international donor conference that was held on April 4-5 in Brussels.

Moscow hopes that the incident will not lead to the derailment of intra-Syrian talks as that would play into hands of those who strive to obstruct the peace process.

“Anything can affect the talks. But we would not like for such incidents to be used by opponents of the negotiation process to disrupt it,” the Russian diplomat said, stressing that it is necessary for the negotiations to be inclusive.

Despite the apparent discord at the conference, its participants were largely united in that there is no alternative to political settlement to the protracted military conflict.

“I would like to note that all spoke in favor of political solution, the majority agreed that there is no military solution,” Gatilov said, as cited by TASS. He added that “practically all hailed” the negotiations in Astana made possible by the mediation of Russia, Turkey and Iran and commended them as “great help” for the Geneva process.

No breakthrough has yet been achieved in the talks, Gatilov said, referring to the latest round of intra-Syrian negotiations that took place in Geneva last week.

“Regrettably, so far it has yielded no practical results but it is not the reason to say that the round failed. Obviously, it is going to be a long process and we had been saying this all the time,” Gatilov said.

The slow progress is due to major differences between the take of the Syrian government and rebels on an array of key issues, he said. The major point of disagreement between the sides is what topic should be given a priority in the talks. While opposition argues that the talks should pave way for a transitional government, the Syrian authorities insist on the preeminence of the fight against terrorism.

On Tuesday, a suspected chemical attack on the hospital in the town of Khan Sheikhoun in rebel-held Idlib province claimed the lives of dozens of people, including children. Rebel groups accused the Syrian government of mounting the attack, the claims which the Syrian authorities flatly denied.

Russia has demanded a thorough investigation into the incident, saying it should be led by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said. The OPCW will be entrusted with collecting evidence of the attack within the fact-finding mission. The composition of the mission should be subject to approval by the UN Security Council.

In the aftermath of the attack, Russia’s Defense Ministry issued a statement, saying that the Syrian Air Force on Tuesday bombed a warehouse housing chemical weapons bound for Iraq. The storage facility, which was used to produce and store munitions containing toxic gas, was managed by the rebels. Defense Ministry spokesman Major-General Igor Konashenkov noted that the symptoms displayed by the victims of the attack in Khan Sheikhoun are similar to those shown by civilians who suffered in the Aleppo chemical attack, perpetrated by the militants.

The death of civilians has sparked an international outcry, with some of the Western governments, including the US, backing the allegations put forward by the rebels.

Commenting on the attack, US President Donald Trump said that it was “unacceptable” went “beyond the red line” and made him to rethink his stance on the Syrian government and President Bashar Assad.

In his turn, Vice President Mike Pence blamed the attack on a “failure of the past administration to both confront the mindless violence of the Assad regime and also hold Russia and Syria to account for the promises to destroy chemical weapons,” in an interview to Fox News on Wednesday.

Responding to a question, if Washington sees Moscow also responsible for the attack, Pence stated that Russian must ensure the implementation of the pledge by the Syrian government to destroy all chemical stockpiles, saying that “the time come has come for them [Russia] to keep the word that they made, to see the elimination of the chemical weapons so that they no longer threaten the people in that country.”

“We were told that there were an agreement between Russians and Assad to destroy chemical weapons and that the threat to civilians from a chemical attack had been eliminated, it was not,” Pence claimed.


RT

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